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Stringybark, White

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White stringybark occurs along the coast and adjacent tablelands of New South Wales, extending north to Yarraman, Queensland, with isolated stands in the Carnarvon Range and Blackdown Tableland areas, and on elevated sites as far north as Cooktown. It is a medium-sized forest tree growing to 35 metres in height, with a stem diameter of up to one metre. The trunk is generally straight and of good form.

The heartwood of this species is light brown to pale pink in colour. Sapwood is paler but not always clearly distinguishable from the true wood. Grain is generally uniform and medium-textured, but occasional interlocking can produce attractive figure in some samples.

White stringybark is rated as a class 2 hardwood with an above ground life expectancy of up to 40 years, and an in ground life expectancy of between 15 and 25 years. It is not termite-resistant. Sapwood (but not heartwood) is readily impregnated with preservatives. White stringybark is not susceptible to lyctid borer (powder post beetle) attack.

Although White stringybark is a very hard timber (rated 1 on a 6-class scale), it machines and turns well, and is amenable to the use of standard fastenings and fittings. It readily accepts paint, stains and polish. As with most high-density species, machining and surface preparation should be done immediately prior to gluing.

The timber of this species is used across a range of applications. Sawn timber is used in wharf and bridge construction; as railway sleepers, cross-arms, poles, piles and mining timbers; and for general house framing and cladding, flooring and decking, linings and joinery. White stringybark is also used for fencing, landscaping and retaining walls. Other uses include outdoor furniture and turnery; boat, coach and carriage building; and structural plywood.

Appearance

The heartwood of white stringybark is light brown, and occasionally pale pink in colour. Sapwood is paler in colour but not sharply differentiated. Grain is generally uniform and medium-textured, but occasional interlocking can produce attractive figure in some samples.

Common Applications

Timber from this species is used across a range of applications. Sawn timber is used in wharf and bridge construction; as railway sleepers, cross-arms, poles, piles and mining timbers; and for general house framing and cladding, flooring and decking, linings and joinery. It is also used for fencing, landscaping and retaining walls. Other uses include outdoor furniture and turnery; boat, coach and carriage building; and structural plywood.

 

Common Form

Sawn

Workability

White stringybark machines and turns well and can be used with standard fittings and fastenings. As with most high-density species, machining and surface preparation should be done immediately before gluing. White stringybark readily accepts paint, stains and polishes.

 

Origin of Timber

NSW

Readily Available

NSW

Availability - Further Information

White stringybark is a common east-coast species.

Availability - Further Information

Native Forest

Shrinkage

Very Low Low Medium High Very High

Tangential :

10.60%

Radial:

5.60%

Unit Movement Tangential:

0.36%

Unit Movement Radial:

0.25%

Strength Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium High

Medium

Reasonably Low

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

Seasoned:

SD1

SD2

SD3

SD4

SD5

SD6

SD7

SD8

Stress Grade

Structural
No. 1
Structural
No. 2
Structural
No. 3
Structural
No. 4
Structural
No. 5

Unseasoned:

F17

F14

F11

F8

F7

Seasoned:

F27

F22

F17

F14

F11

Density per Standard

Seasoned:

855kg/m3

Unseasoned:

1120kg/m3

Joint Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

J1

J2

J3

J4

J5

J6

Seasoned:

JD1

JD2

JD3

JD4

JD5

JD6

Colour

  White, yellow, pale straw to light brown Pink to pink brown Light to dark red Brown, chocolate, mottled or streaky
   

Mechanical Properties

Modulus of Rupture - Unseasoned:

81

Modulus of Rupture - Seasoned:

136

Modulus of Elasticity - Unseasoned:

13.4

Modulus of Elasticity - Seasoned:

17

Maximum Crushing Strength - Unseasoned:

44

Maximum Crushing Strength - Seasoned:

75

Impact - Unseasoned:

17.4

Impact - Seasoned:

18.6

Toughness - Unseasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Toughness - Seasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Hardness - Unseasoned:

6.4

Hardness - Seasoned:

9

Durability

Low Moderate Reasonably High High
(0 - 5 yrs) (5 - 15 yrs) (15 - 25 yrs) (more than 25 yrs)

In-Ground:

(0 - 7 yrs) (7 - 15 yrs) (15 - 40 yrs) (More than 40 yrs)

Above ground:

(0 - 20 yrs, usually < 5) (21 - 40 yrs) (41 - 64 yrs) (More than 60 yrs)

Marine Borer Resistance:

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility:

Not Susceptible

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility - Other:

Termite Resistance:

Resistant

Fire Properties

1 - non-combustible 2 - reasonably non-combustible 3 - slightly combustible 4 - combustible

Fire Properties Group
Number:

Group Number - Other:

3 if used on MDF or particleboard ≥12mm; veneer thickness 0.6-0.85mm

Average Specific Extinction Area:

<250

Bushfire Resistance:

BAL 12.5 and 19 – All AS3959 required applications

Joinery

Timber joinery products offer a classic, unique and stylish touch to any interior or exterior design. The products are produced for a variety of internal applications including door and window frames, cabinetry, skirtings, mouldings and architraves. When looking to the outdoors, joinery products range from decorative eaves and posts to eye-catching railings.

Many timber species are suitable for joinery products and care should be taken in selecting the perfect timber for the particular product and its intended finish. Rare and exotic species such as Teak and Rosewood can generate pieces of outstanding beauty but material cost and availability are also important considerations.

Commercially available species like Tasmanian oak, Australian cypress, spotted gum and the like, often make the more practical choice, with the added benefit that they can be easily matched with other timber products within the building, like flooring.

Solid timber for joinery products is generally supplied as ‘clear finish grade' but ‘paint grade' options are available and these are usually comprised of a composite material like MDF or glulam.

A large number of specialist suppliers and producers offer the consumer extensive choice of profiles for all of the most common and popular joinery products. Choice is in many cases, limited only by imagination.

Cabinetry is often associated with joinery and most typically includes, cupboards, benches and other similar ‘built in' furniture. Like joinery, cabinetry is generally specified as either paint or clear finish grade and naturally for clear finish grade timbers, appearance and surface finish are critical in achieving a successful application.

 

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