Stringybark, Yellow

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Yellow stringybark is a medium to large hardwood species that grows in southern New South Wales and eastern Victoria. The tree features yellow to yellowish-brown heartwood with distinctively paler sapwood. Its grain is medium to fine, mainly straight but sometimes interlocked. Gum veins and bug holes are common.

Historically, commercial applications of yellow stringybark have ranged from wood chips to heavy construction in the form of piles, poles, bearers and stumps. Its timber is now widely used for flooring, decking and furniture. Excellent results have been obtained for outdoor structures such as pergolas, steps and hand railings. When appropriately kiln-dried, yellow stringybark may be used as a structural timber.

Untreated yellow stringybark is equivalent to ‘fire retardant treated timber’ when tested in accordance with AS/NZS 3837. The bushfire rating of this timber is expected to remain unchanged if assessed in accordance with proposed changes to the standard.

 

Appearance

Yellow stringybark features a yellow to yellowish brown heartwood, with paler sapwood. Its grain is medium to fine, and is mainly straight but sometimes interlocked. Gum veins and bug holes are common.

 

Common Applications

Yellow stringybark was once mainly used for heavy construction (piles, poles, bearers, stumps) and wood chips. It is now commonly used for flooring, decking and furniture. Excellent results have been obtained with the use of this timber for outdoor structures such as pergolas, steps and hand railings. When appropriately kiln-dried, yellow stringybark may be used as a structural timber.

 

Common Form

Sawn

Workability

This native hardwood machines and sands well to produce excellent flooring. It is unsuitable for steam bending. Pre-drilling is recommended for nailing and screwing. Yellow stringybark readily accepts most standard coatings and stains, and excellent results may be obtained with oil-based finishes. Given the timber’s natural density, polyurethane glues are recommended for bonding. 

 

Origin of Timber

NSW

Readily Available

NSW

Availability - Further Information

Yellow stringybark is also available in Victoria.

Availability - Further Information

Native Forest

Shrinkage

Very Low Low Medium High Very High

Tangential :

7.50%

Radial:

4.30%

Unit Movement Tangential:

0.37%

Unit Movement Radial:

0.27%

Strength Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium High

Medium

Reasonably Low

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

Seasoned:

SD1

SD2

SD3

SD4

SD5

SD6

SD7

SD8

Stress Grade

Structural
No. 1
Structural
No. 2
Structural
No. 3
Structural
No. 4
Structural
No. 5

Unseasoned:

F17

F14

F11

F8

F7

Seasoned:

F27

F22

F17

F14

F11

Density per Standard

Seasoned:

885kg/m3

Unseasoned:

1150kg/m3

Joint Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

J1

J2

J3

J4

J5

J6

Seasoned:

JD1

JD2

JD3

JD4

JD5

JD6

Colour

  White, yellow, pale straw to light brown Pink to pink brown Light to dark red Brown, chocolate, mottled or streaky
   

Mechanical Properties

Modulus of Rupture - Unseasoned:

86

Modulus of Rupture - Seasoned:

132

Modulus of Elasticity - Unseasoned:

14

Modulus of Elasticity - Seasoned:

17

Maximum Crushing Strength - Unseasoned:

45

Maximum Crushing Strength - Seasoned:

76

Impact - Unseasoned:

17

Impact - Seasoned:

15

Toughness - Unseasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Toughness - Seasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Hardness - Unseasoned:

6.7

Hardness - Seasoned:

8.6

Durability

Low Moderate Reasonably High High
(0 - 5 yrs) (5 - 15 yrs) (15 - 25 yrs) (more than 25 yrs)

In-Ground:

(0 - 7 yrs) (7 - 15 yrs) (15 - 40 yrs) (More than 40 yrs)

Above ground:

(0 - 20 yrs, usually < 5) (21 - 40 yrs) (41 - 64 yrs) (More than 60 yrs)

Marine Borer Resistance:

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility:

Not Susceptible

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility - Other:

Termite Resistance:

Resistant

Fire Properties

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

EFH Spread-of-Flame Index:

EFH Smoke-Developed Index:

Critical Radiance Flux - Lower:

>2.2 and <4.5

Smoke Development Rate:

<750
1 - non-combustible 2 - reasonably non-combustible 3 - slightly combustible 4 - combustible

Fire Properties Group
Number:

Group Number - Other:

>2.2 and <4.5

Average Specific Extinction Area:

<250

Bushfire Resistance:

BAL 12.5 and 19 – All AS3959 required applications

Fencing

The inherent appeal and strength of timber makes it the obvious choice for fencing. Timber fencing not only provides a natural look in keeping with the outdoor environment but it also enables the construction of a long lasting, durable property boundary. Fences come in many forms including the traditional paling, picket, post and railing styles. Most rely on a structural frame of posts embedded into the ground and two or more rails spanning between the posts. The ultimate selection of a suitable fence type or style is determined by application and aesthetics. A fence can serve a variety of purposes, including the provision of security, privacy and safety in addition to defining property boundaries. Specification for durability is important, especially for posts, given their exposure to high moisture in the ground.

This section provides an overview to best practice methods in specifying, installing and finishing a timber fence.

Pergolas

Timber pergolas offer an attractive and economical way to create functional living and entertainment areas in the outdoors.  Pergolas designed with care can maximise both winter sunshine and summer shade, ensuring outdoor living is enjoyed all year round. With its natural look, durability and versatility there are few other materials that can match the advantages of timber in pergola construction.

Pergolas are typically constructed via a straightforward post and beam process, which can be attached to an existing building or form a free standing structure. A protective finishing coat will preserve the life of the pergola and a variety of paints and stains are available on the market to facilitate this.

 

Rails and Balustrades, Exterior

The versatility, strength and natural beauty of timber makes it the ideal material choice for external handrails and balustrades. Usually built from treated softwood and durable hardwoods these timbers can be turned to create a range of styles and designs, resulting in balusters that are unique as they are individual. Painting, staining and oil based finishes broadly cover the wide range of finishing options available and with the appropriate care and attention a timber balustrade can last a lifetime.

This guide provides general information on member sizes, connections and suitable materials to enable the construction of a long lasting, attractive and durable timber handrail or balustrade.

Structural Timber Poles

Timber pole construction is typically utilised to provide support for gravity loads and resistance against lateral forces. The natural appeal of timber ensures that its role is not purely structural however, with timber poles complimenting architectural designs aimed at harmonisation with the natural environment. The small number of footings required in pole frame construction also ensures minimal disturbances to the site.

With a double bearer system, poles can be spaced further apart than is usual, creating a more spacious building interior, that allows greater interior design flexibility. While poles are usually placed in a grid like system this is not compulsory and the flexibility of the application means the system can cope with a wide variety of designs, enabling designers to take full advantage of beautiful outlooks.

This article provides a comprehensive overview of the process involved in specifying, designing and constructing a solid timber pole construction.

Flooring

Whether for structural or finished flooring applications, timber offers durability, versatility and adaptability. The warmth, strength and natural beauty of timber flooring has proved enduringly popular in a wide variety of interior settings.

Timber flooring is a timeless product, offering a warmth and natural beauty largely unmatched by other flooring options. This article provides an overview of the installation of solid timber strip flooring over bearers and joists, timber based sheet flooring products and concrete slabs. Timber flooring is typically supplied as either solid timber or laminated wood products, made from layers of bonded timber. It fits together with a tongue and groove joint and once in place, is sanded and finished. There is a wide variety of species to select flooring from and the right species for a given application will be dependent on numerous factors. Information relating to species selection, environmental assessment, finish selection and recommended maintenance routines are all provided in this section.

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