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Question

Is Teak suitable for public street furniture (Seat Battens)?

Woodsolutions Answer +

Teak has excellent weathering qualities and is a good choice for outdoor furniture in a domestic situation. However, it's not high on the hardness scale. Timber species are rated for hardness according to the Janka test. Teak comes in at about 4.5, whereas an Australian hardwood such as tallowwood rates 8.6, ie. nearly twice as hard. So if the seating will be in a location where hardness could be an issue you might consider a denser hardwood.

Outdoor seating

Answered on 26-10-2020
Please note that our answer is based on the best advice available at the time. If the National Construction Code, Australian Standards or local requirements have been subsequently amended, our answer may no longer be correct in all details. For more information, please read our disclaimer.

Question

i am trying to find out ignitibility time for W.R.Cedar in minutes for timber windows as council have asked for a timber that is 60 minutes plus time to comply with job we have to supply .Or a timber suitable to comply.

Woodsolutions Answer +

No doubt the requirement is for a Fire Resistance Level (FRL) expressed as -/60/- where the 60 refers to the 'integrity' of the window, meaning the ability to resist the passage of flames for 60 minutes. It commonly applies to windows on a boundary. A standard timber window with standard glass would not be able to achieve this rating. However, you will find certified timber windows on the net if you write '60 min fire resistant timber windows' or similar wording in your browser.

Fire resistant windows

Answered on 24-10-2020
Please note that our answer is based on the best advice available at the time. If the National Construction Code, Australian Standards or local requirements have been subsequently amended, our answer may no longer be correct in all details. For more information, please read our disclaimer.

Question

We recently commissioned a Messmate benchtop. The joiner sent us photos of his board selection, but they must have been oxidized as the photos did not indicate the pink tones of the raw timber. They looked mid-brown and seemed to have some dark 'features' in them so we approved it and the benchtop was finalised. Now that we have it, we’re 100% convinced the timber used is not Messmate. The top was supplied to us sanded to 120 grit unfinished. We sanded then oiled the timber with 2 coats of untinted linseed oil (Sceneys Old Fashion Weatherproof Oil) ourselves, that’s when it became very obvious that the timber was not Messmate. The timber is dark pink to reddish-brown and has a straight coarse grain. There are no visible gum veins or growth rings, Best to see photos which I am sharing here:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Zo2QpbwGkhow_tSRMQLyUgszeFHTVa9p/view?u...
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1X7zpVk9_a2X0ePU2lP_Gi5OVt0EtwJ1r/view?u...

What do you think this timber is? Can you also confirm our suspicions that this is definitely not Messmate?

Woodsolutions Answer +

It's hard to identify a timber species from a photo but your benchtop looks somewhat redder than we would expect messmate to be. We have a description of messmate on our website and an image, although our image is perhaps a little on the yellow side. Messmate typically has more brown tones. However, this description may be helpful https://www.woodsolutions.com.au/wood-species/messmateTo identify a timber species with certainty, a small end-grain sample needs to be examined under a microscope. If you want to pursue this further we suggest you contact Dr. Jugo Ilic in Melbourne who is an authority on wood identification. You will find details of his background on several internet sites including this one: http://www.woodreview.com.au/news/jugo-ilic.  If you email Dr. Ilic at http://knowyourwood1@gmail.com he can advise you on the required sample size, fee for service,  and postal address to send your sample.

Messmate

Answered on 22-10-2020
Please note that our answer is based on the best advice available at the time. If the National Construction Code, Australian Standards or local requirements have been subsequently amended, our answer may no longer be correct in all details. For more information, please read our disclaimer.

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